Microsoft to Issue Out-of-Band Security Bulletin

March 29, 2010

Microsoft has issued an advance notification for a Security Bulletin to be issued tomorrow, March 30, outside its normal monthly patch release cycle.  The primary purpose of this patch release is to provide a fix for a flaw in Internet Explorer versions 6 and 7, which I have written about earlier this month.  (I posted a note here about a temporary fix.)   The fix, as is common for IE patches, will be cumulative, incorporating previous updates.  Users of Internet Explorer version 8 should note that, although the patch is primarily aimed at the flaw in IE 6 and 7, it will also include fixes for IE 8 on all supported versions of Windows.  The IE 8 fixes are rated Critical for Windows XP, Vista, and 7.

As usual, I will post an update here once the patches are actually released.


Apple Releases “Snow Leopard” 10.6.3

March 29, 2010

Apple has released an updated version, 10.6.3, of the Mac OS X operating system, “Snow Leopard”.  The new version incorporated numerous fixes to system components, summarized here (essentially, the release notes, although Apple doesn’t use that term).   It also incorporates a number (69) of security fixes.

The new version can be downloaded and installed through the built-in Software Update mechanism.  Alternatively, you can download a stand-alone installation package, which may be handy if you have several machines to upgrade.

The “Infinite Loop” blog at Ars Technica has an article discussing the updates.


Courting Google, Again

March 29, 2010

I’ve written here a couple of times before about some of the antics that some localities are using to try to become Google’s choice for their 1+ Gbps fiber network experiment.  The deadline for localities to submit entries was last Friday, so there won’t e any more, but one late entry really is in a class by itself.  According to an article on the “Law and Disorder” blog at Ars Technica, a city councilman in Raleigh NC, Mr. Bonner Gaylord, has promised to name his as-yet-unborn twins “Larry” and “Sergey”, after the founders of Google, if Raleigh is chosen for the experiment.  (He did sort of wimp out at the last minute, and include a proviso that the children must be boys.)  As my friend Phil would say, this is height of something or other.

These various shenanigans have attracted some attention at Google, although it’s not clear that it is attention of the desired kind.  But Google does have an official blog post listing some of the other stunts.


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